Sandy: One year later

Brooklyn Currents | 10/27/2013 | 0 comments

As if to mark the anniversary of Sandy, a horrific storm -- although not technically a hurricane -- devastated parts of western Europe  on Monday, Oct. 28. The Associated Press had this coverage:


Waves batter the sea wall of a marina in Brighton, in southern England, Monday. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
Waves batter the sea wall of a marina in Brighton, England, on Oct. 28. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
LONDON (AP) - A savage coastal storm powered by hurricane-force gusts slashed its way through Britain and western Europe on Monday, felling trees, flooding lowlands and snarling traffic in the air, at sea and on land. At least 13 people were reported killed.

It was one of the worst storms to hit the region in years.

Gusts of 99 miles per hour were reported on the Isle of Wight in southern England, while gusts up to 80 mph hit the British mainland. Later in the day, the Danish capital of Copenhagen saw record gusts up of to 120 mph and an autobahn in central Germany was shut down by gusts up to 62 mph.

A car is seen crushed under a fallen tree as a man pushes a bicycle following a storm, in Hornsey, north London. (AP Photo/PA, Yui Mok

Workmen survey the damage caused by a crane brought down by high winds onto the roof of the Cabinet Office in Whitehall, near Downing Street in London, Monday. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
London’s cheder children brave their way to school. (Dudi Braun)
London’s cheder children brave their way to school. (Dudi Braun)

Emergency services work at the scene of a fallen tree at Bath Road in Hounslow, west London Monday. (REUTERS/Toby Melville)
Emergency services work at the scene of a fallen tree at Bath Road in Hounslow, west London (REUTERS/Toby Melville)
All across the region, people were warned to stay indoors. Hundreds of trees were uprooted or split, blocking roads and crushing cars. The Dutch were told to leave their beloved bicycles at home for safety’s sake.

At least thirteen storm-related deaths were reported, most victims crushed by falling trees. Germany had six deaths, Britain had five and the Netherlands and Denmark had one each. One woman was also missing after being swept into the surf in France.

Two people were killed in London by a gas explosion and a British teen who played in the storm-driven surf was swept out to sea. A man in Denmark was killed when a brick flew off and hit him in the head.
Despite the strength of its gusts, the storm was not considered a hurricane because it didn’t form over warm expanses of open ocean like the hurricanes that batter the Caribbean and the United States. Britain’s national weather service, the Met Office, said Britain does not get hurricanes because those are “warm latitude” storms that draw their energy from seas far warmer than the North Atlantic. Monday’s storm also did not have an “eye” at its center like most hurricanes.

London’s Heathrow Airport, Europe’s busiest, canceled at least 130 flights, and giant waves prompted the major English port of Dover to close, cutting off ferry service to France.

Here are some links to coverage of the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy from city, national, and international media outlets:
  1. NY1
  2. Associated Press
  3. Crain's New York Business
  4. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
  5. The Daily News
  6. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24721439

Category:

Article by

Follow Brooklyn Currents on Facebook and Twitter
Brooklyn on the Web.

0 comments